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Contextual Genomics and the NCIC Clinical Trials Group Announce Scientific Collaboration to Study Cancer Gene Mutations

Vancouver, BC – September 15, 2015 – Contextual Genomics, developers of genomics-based cancer tests, is pleased to announce a scientific collaboration with the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (NCIC CTG) to research gene mutations in cancer.

As part of the collaboration, NCIC CTG will use Contextual’s genomics-based cancer tests to determine the cancer mutations present in patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial conducted by NCIC CTG. Contextual Genomics’ CG001 Hotspot Cancer Panel focuses on known mutations in solid tumour cancers most of which are treatable with current therapies or Phase 3 investigational treatments. The results of the test will help identify therapeutic targets and drive a shift to personalized treatment for patients.

“Research conducted by NCIC CTG has contributed globally to a deeper understanding into the treatment of cancer that has led to better health outcomes of patients,” commented Chris Wagner, President and CEO of Contextual Genomics. “We are pleased to be working with the internationally-leading oncology researchers at NCIC CTG to further investigate gene mutations in cancer.“

“Understanding the gene mutations causing certain cancers enables oncologists to determine the best course of treatment, so that patients are not exposed to potentially toxic drugs with little hope of benefit. In early clinical trials testing new drugs it is also critical to understand which gene mutations and aberrations are present in a patient’s tumour so that the trial can help define patients who are most likely to respond and benefit from a new treatment. Contextual’s genomics-based cancer testing allows us to correlate a patient’s individual tumour profile at a molecular level to their response to the new drug being studied in our trial,” said Lesley Seymour, Director of the Investigational New Drug Program at NCIC CTG.

About the NCIC Clinical Trials Group
The NCIC CTG is the only Canadian cooperative cancer trials group conducting the entire range of cancer trials from early phase studies to large international randomized controlled trials across all cancer types. Its primary mission is to assess the effectiveness of interventions to prevent the development of cancer or improve the care of those patients who do develop cancer. NCIC CTG trials have led to improved outcomes for cancer patients. It is a national research program of the Canadian Cancer Society. The NCIC CTG’s Central Operations and Statistics Office is located at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

About Contextual Genomics: www.contextualgenomics.com
Contextual Genomics is developing a novel suite of standardized genomics-based cancer tests to identify a patient’s tumour profile. This precision in cancer diagnosis allows healthcare professionals to more accurately determine the most effective treatment options for the patient using a single test. The company’s first products are actionable molecular tests that unify multiple companion diagnostics for multiple medicines into a single test that guides diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Led by global leaders in molecular diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics who have unparalleled expertise in genomic assay development, Contextual Genomics aims to bring patients a gold standard in molecular diagnostics that will lead to advanced services in personalized cancer care.

For further information:

Contextual Genomics
Chris Wagner
President and CEO
778-379-2931
cwagner@contextualgenomics.com

NCIC Clinical Trial Group
Heather Stanton
Grants and Communications Administrator
613-533-6430
hstanton@ctg.queensu.ca

This release contains forward-looking statements that are not based on historical fact. These forward-looking statements involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, events or developments to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements.